will Social Security survive?
 

Current Training Available

Course 1: Introduction to System Dynamics Modeling for Math and Science Instructors: Basic Models

Sponsored by: CC Modeling Systems and Portland State University

Dates: June 12 – August 19, 2017

Description: Course 1: Participants will build basic models and use lessons directly applicable to their classes. Lots of lessons available. The approach is based on hands-on model building to understand concepts in math and science. This course provides the foundation for Course 2 which will be offered in the summer of 2017.

Course 2: Introduction to System Dynamics Modeling for Math and Science Instructors: More Advanced Models

Sponsored by: CC Modeling Systems and Portland State University

Dates: June 12 – August 19, 2017

Description: Course 2: Participants will build more advanced models and use lessons directly applicable to their classes. Lots of lessons available. The approach is based on hands-on model building to understand concepts in math and science. This course provides the foundation for Course 3 which will be offered in the summer of 2017.

Course 3: Modeling Dynamic Systems: A Different Way to Think

Sponsored by: CC Modeling Systems and Portland State University

Dates: June 12 – August 19, 2017

Description: Course 3: Participants will build original models from the news or from their curriculum. Additional lessons available that help provide practice for model verification and validation and provide policy analysis. The approach is based on hands-on model building to understand concepts in many disciplines (math, science, social science, health, economics, and others that involve the study of dynamics systemic problems. This is the final course in the three course online sequence in learning to build models of dynamic feedback systems.

Past Training

  • Half-Day workshop for DLSNC High School Science Teachers, Modeling Dynamic Feedback Systems, April 2016, Portland, Oregon
  • Three day workshop for math and engineering professors, Using System Dynamics Modeling to Enhance Core Math Concepts, at Technologico de Monterrey University, May 2016, Monterrey, Mexico.
  • 2.5-Day workshop for UTSA teachers of PREP (Pre-Engineering Program), System Dynamics Modeling to Study Complex Systems, June 2016, San Antonio, Texas.
  • Presentation, Students in High School Build Pharmacokinetic Models Using System Dynamics, Innovations in Collaborative Modeling Conference, June 2016, East Lansing, Michigan.
  • Presentation, From Data Collection to System Dynamics Models, Creative Learning Exchange ST/DM Conference, June 2016, Wellesley, MA.
  • Presentation, two papers, International Conference for Mathematics Educators, July 2016, Hamburg, Germany.

Workshop 1: Professional Development in System Dynamics, Online Courses; Workshop 2: Finding Systems: The News to Use

Sponsored by: the Creative Learning Exchange:  Systems Thinking and Dynamic Modeling Conference

Dates: June 28–30, 2014, at Babson Executive Conference Center, Wellesley, Massachusetts

Description: Workshop 1: Participants will work through some model-building lessons that will be provided in the first online System Dynamics (SD) modeling course for math and science instructors and observe the structure of the online course. Workshop 2: System dynamicist, Warren Farr, and I will guide participants through selecting appropriate news articles from which SD models can be constructed, and through the beginning stages of such model construction.

Workshop: Actively Experiencing Systems and Creating New Models for Deeper Understanding

Sponsored by: the Waters Foundation: Camp Snowball Conference

Dates:  July 14–18, 2014, at Portland State University, Portland, Oregon

Description:  Anne LaVigne and I will guide participants in the use of kinesthetic experiences and modeling software to gain a deeper understanding of how certain systems behave over time. 

Workshop 1:  Modeling Dynamic Systems: Lessons for a First Course; Workshop 2:  Introduction to System Dynamics Modeling for Math and Science Instruction

Sponsored by: The System Dynamics Society: The International System Dynamics Conference

Dates:  July 21 – 24, 2014, Delft, The Netherlands.

Description: Workshop 1: The structure of lessons used to teach a face-to-face course in System Dynamics Modeling to students ages 15 to 18 will be presented. Participants will work though some modeling lessons. Workshop 2: The structure of lessons used to teach an online course in System Dynamics Modeling to math and science instructors (of students ages 15 to 20+) will be presented. Participants will have an opportunity to work with some of the lessons and observe some videos that are part of this course.

Mini-Course: Using Models to Support Conceptual Calculus in Algebra Classes

Sponsored by: The Northwest Math Conference

Dates: October 9, 2014, 9 am - noon, Red Lion on the River, Portland, Oregon

Description: Math teachers will work with model-building lessons that students can create to help them understand drug dynamics, predator/prey interactions, resource depletion and more.  The focus is the relationship between rates of change and accumulations.  Icon-based depicts dependencies visually, appealing to a broad audience of students.

Workshop: Budget Models for Long-Term Planning for Elementary Catholic School Principals

Sponsored by: Each school whose principal was interested in participating

Date: (first workshop) November 4, 2013 (second workshop) January 16, 2014

Description: A four-hour workshop designed to assist principals in learning to use the STELLA modeling software as they experiment with an elementary school budget (template) model designed to help with long-term decision-making policies. The principals will also decide how they would like the model modified to help describe the dynamics of their particular school system, filling in their own school data. After the workshop, consultation will be available to assist each principal in modifying the template budget model, so the final model will match each school’s dynamics.

Workshop: NASA MODSIM (Modeling & Simulation) for High School Math Teachers

Sponsored by: NASA Langley Research Center and Radford University

Date: July 15–26, 2013, at NASA Langley Research Center, Langley, Virginia

Description: A two-week modeling and simulation workshop for high school mathematics teachers in Virginia. The workshop provides instruction in system dynamics modeling appropriate for the high school mathematics classroom, and provides a hook for interdisciplinary lesson planning within their schools. The teachers will work with the STELLA software building models, will reflect on curriculum change, and will develop their own lessons to use in their classrooms in the fall. They will align many of their lessons with the Virginia Standards of Learning Mathematics. As the workshop is housed at the NASA Langley Research Center, the teachers also will have an opportunity to take field trips to flight simulators, crash landing test sites, and wind tunnels. They will have presentations by leading NASA research scientists on the importance of simulation and modeling in space exploration and how frequently NASA engineers use simulation in their work.  

Keynote Presentation: Thinking in Systems: Why this is Critical for K-12 and Decision-Makers?

Sponsored by: CEFPI—Council for Educational Facility Planners International

Date: Dec. 6–7, 2012: Anchorage, Alaska

Description: More holistic thinking is very important for anyone who has to deal with systemic problems. This presentation will identify the systems thinking and system dynamics modeling skills that have been successfully implemented in K-12 for the past 20 years in some US schools. Finally, one example of a problem, appropriate for a city planner, will be analyzed to suggest why a systemic perspective, using modeling, is essential for making more informed decisions.

Portland State University Course: Sci 313U: Environmental Math Modeling

Sponsored by: Portland State University, collectively by the Environmental Science and Management and the System Science Departments

Date: April 1 to June 14, 2013, Portland, Oregon

Description: System dynamics is a mathematical model-building methodology for studying complex system behavior. By analyzing feedback loop interaction one can gain a deeper understanding of the causes of systemic behavior, see how delays can create instability in a system, identify leverage points, test policies that might mitigate undesirable behaviors or unintended consequences. This will be a hands-on modeling course. Although the models will be primarily geared to environmental science, the modeling approach is applicable to Biology, Economics, Health, Sustainability, Geography, Physics/Physical Science, Engineering, Mathematics, and Business Management.

Workshops (2):

Sponsored by: International System Dynamics Conference (for business consultants, government decision makers, university professors, and others interested in promoting systemic analysis of local and global problems)

Date: July 22–26, 2012; St. Gallen, Switzerland

Workshop 1: Modeling Dynamic Systems: Lessons for a First Course

Description: "Modeling Dynamics Systems: Lessons for a First Course” (third edition) provides a set of materials that enable educators at the secondary and college levels to teach a one-semester or one-year course in System Dynamics modeling. These lessons are also useful for trainers in a business environment.  Developed for beginning modelers, the lessons contained in this book can be used for a core curriculum or for independent study. The lessons include some of the classic System Dynamics problems (population change, resource sustainability, drug pharmacokinetics, spread of an epidemic, urban growth,  supply and demand, and more). Feedback analysis is integral to the lessons. Guidelines for an independent project and an outline for a technical paper explaining the creation process and structure of the final model, together with scoring guides for both the model and the paper, are included. Participants in the workshop will have a chance to build some simple models (participants should bring laptops) and gain a sense of the progression leading to a more sophisticated model. Student work will be demonstrated and can also be viewed at ccmodelingsystems.com. New materials in the third edition (oscillations, transfer of loop dominance, mapping systems in the news,…) of this book will be presented.

Workshop 2: Introducing Change over Time Lessons for Math and Science Pre-College Classes

Description: Central to understanding dynamic phenomenon is understanding change over time patterns. In school, these patterns are formally introduced using symbolic representations which are often not intuitive to students. Activities that introduce some of the simple behavior patterns in a more intuitive manner will be introduced, followed by the stock/flow modeling structure that will capture the important components that produce the given pattern of change. Then these structures can be used together to study more realistic (but still simple) systemic problems appropriate for undergraduate students.  Participants should expect to participate in the activities and follow up by building the models.

Workshop: Using the SD process to teach STEM and Common Core Math & Science

Sponsored by: 10th Biennial Systems Thinking and Dynamic Modeling Conference (for K-12 Educators) Creative Learning Exchange

Date: June 30 - July 2, 2012: Wellesley, Massachusetts

Description: There is increased emphasis on the value of modeling in the Common Core math and science standards and in STEM to help students surface their mental models so misconceptions can be addressed. System dynamics models help students construct and test hypotheses as active participants in the scientific process. Participants will build models involving resource depletion and predator/prey interactions, among others. This workshop is appropriate for middle and high school math and science teachers. Participants should have a laptop computer for this intermediate level workshop.

Keynote Presentation: Leveraging Systems Thinking and Systems Modeling to Educate for Sustainability

Sponsored by: Sustainable Schools—Sustainable Solutions Conference

Date: June 19, 2012: Gladstone High School, Gladstone, Oregon

Description: How is it possible to implement systems thinking and system dynamics modeling in grades K-12? New science and sustainability standards recommend infusion of systems thinking into classroom discussions and activities. This presentation will explain what skills are appropriate to introduce at each level that are developmentally appropriate for the students and describe lessons teachers have been using to do this work successfully for 20 years.

Workshop: Modeling Dynamic Feedback Systems

Sponsored by: La Salle High School, Milwaukee, Oregon

Date: April 25, 2012 and May 16, 2012; 8:00 am - 2:30 pm each day.

Description: Math and science teachers will build small models involving drug dynamics, population and natural resource consumption and issues of sustainability, spread of epidemics, and other applications relevant to the math and science high school curriculum. Participants will design lessons appropriate for their classes.

Keynote Presentation—Lifetime Achievement Award: “Everybody Thinking Differently:” K-12 is a Leverage Point

Sponsored by: International System Dynamics Conference (for business consultants, government decision makers, university professors, and others interested in promoting systemic analysis of local and global problems)

Date: July 25 to July 28, 2011: Washington, D.C.

Description: As a global community we are faced with many systemic problems.  Current areas of research show promise for improving the human condition. A significant number of the problems and new areas of research require an understanding of the systems involved.  An analytical approach that has proven successful in the study of dynamic feedback systems is systems thinking and system dynamics modeling.  If systems thinking and system dynamics (SD) have been successfully applied to many systemic problems, why are we not teaching this analytical method to our children?  It might be suggested that SD is too sophisticated, much too difficult for children to learn.  This suggestion would be wrong.  Systems thinking and system dynamics modeling concepts that have been successfully taught for 20 years to students in the United States, ages 7 to 18 years, are presented, with highlights describing some of the lessons/activities used.

Workshop: Camp Snowball: SystemsThinking*Sustainability: Building Our Capacity to Shape the Future

Date: July 22–23, 2011: Introduction to Computer Modeling/Simulation; 8:00 am - 4:00 pm each day; July 24–25, 2011: Intermediate Computer Modeling/Simulation; 8:00 am - 4:00 pm each day. (Full conference is held from July 21–25); Location: Tucson, Arizona

Description: An introduction to the creation of simple models containing feedback dynamics. Models that have been used in classrooms from grades 5 through 12 will be developed. The workshops are both introductory and intermediate level. These models reinforce core concepts in math, science, economics, health, and social science.

Keynote Presentation and Workshops: Building Models to Enhance Understanding of Core Concepts in Algebra and Biology

Conference: Strength in Numbers: The Power of Mathematics, A Conference for Math and Science Teachers

Sponsored by: Everett Community College, Everett, Washington, contact Pamela Pape-Lindstrom, Biology Professor; Date: June 29–30, 2011; Keynote: 7:00 - 8:30 pm on June 29, two short 1.5 hour workshops, 8:00 am - 12:00 noon, June 30; Location: Everett Community College, Everett, Washington

Description: Using models of feedback dynamics reinforces the core functional behavior of exponential, logistic, and sinusoidal behavior studied in second year algebra, pre-calculus and calculus classes. Combining the basic modeling structures provides access to the study of drug pharmacokinetics, predator/prey interactions, renewable and non-renewable resource systems. It is an exciting way to reinforce concepts in math, biology, environmental science and many more disciplines. It also helps broaden the access of these topics for many students.

Workshop: Better Sustainability Decision-Making: Modeling Dynamic Feedback Systems

Sponsored by: Willamette University Executive Development Center, Portland, Oregon, contact Anne Murray Allan, Director: Date: May 19–20, 2011; 8:00 am - 5:00 pm, June 3, 2011 1:00–5:00 pm; location: Executive Development Center, 1120 NW Couch Street Suite 450, Portland, Oregon; Registration: edc@willamette.edu

Description: An intensive two-day, hands-on experience building simulations to strengthen a systems thinking approach applied to analyzing complex systemic problems. The models will then be used to identify and test leverage points in the system in support of making better decisions. (1 credit)

Workshop: Modeling Dynamic Feedback Systems: Putting Systems Thinking to the Test,

Sponsored by: OSR at Seattle University, Seattle, WA, Date: January 2829, 2011; 8:00 am - 5:00 pm, Location: Chardin Hall, Room 142, Seattle University, Registration: www.osr-nw.org.

Description: An intensive two-day, hands-on experience building simulations to strengthen the systems thinking approach applied to analyzing systemic problems. Building simulations provides the learner with a method for identifying leverage points and testing policies recommended to mitigate a problem under study. It also has the potential to unveil unintended consequences of interventions.

“The deepest systemic insights are gained by either building or using
computer simulations to test assumptions.” (Jay Forrester)

Participants in this workshop will build and test small models containing feedback. It is a hands-on introduction to modeling dynamic systems.

Portland State University Course: Math 488/588 — Topics in Technology for Mathematics Teachers

Sponsored by: Portland State University Mathematics Department; Dates: Jul 19 to Aug 12, 2010; Location: Neuberger Hall, Portland State University

Description: This course will focus on the use of technology to create and analyze simulations that represent different rates of change and accumulations. Examples used in class will come from environmental science, biology, health, physics, economics, and the social sciences. The focus is on the teaching and learning of mathematical concepts. It will be a hands-on course. Although primarily intended for teachers at the high school level, some models could be used at the middle school.

 

Future Possible Training Formats

Two-hour Presentation — “Exposure to the Use of Simulation Models in Teaching High School Math and Science” available free in the Portland, Oregon Metro area for the 2010–2011 school year.

1.5 Day Training — Introduction to System Dynamics Modeling, 1 credit
(Potential Schedule: 7 hours on a Friday, and 3 hours on a Saturday)

This would be a hands-on computer course. Teachers will learn to build small models using generic structures that could apply to multiple disciplines. Simple feedback mechanisms will be introduced. Lessons are provided for immediate use in the high school math and/or science classroom.


30 Hours of Level I Training — System Dynamics Modeling I, 3 credits
(Potential Schedule: 3 hours on Saturday morning for 10 weeks)

The course would be similar in nature to the summer course at PSU, described above, although the focus would not need be primarily on teaching mathematical concepts). This would be a hands-on computer course. Teachers will progress beyond generic structure models and analyze simple feedback in the models they create. Models will apply to multiple disciplines. Appropriate for math (algebra, pre-calculus, calculus), science (especially environmental science, physics, biology), health, economics, and social science teachers.

30 Hours of Level II Training — System Dynamics Modeling II, 3 credits
(Potential Schedule: 3 hours on Saturday morning for 10 weeks)
Prerequisite: Level I Training

The Level II course would take the teacher/student further into modeling dynamic systems. This would be a hands-on computer course. Students will learn to build dynamic parameter structures and use information and material delays in their models. Feedback analysis will become more extensive. Students will build more original models from their area of interest.

Although the Level I and Level II training is intended for teachers, it would be appropriate for business persons who would like to learn this type of modeling to help them analyze the dynamics of problem behavior in their business. Especially in the Level II training, where more original problems are open for study, students outside the school environment would find the curriculum more flexible and appropriate for their area of interest


 

©2010 CC Modeling Systems